Environment Protection

Did you know?

Kandale was once home to a rich and biologically diverse ecosystem, with lush forests, and was the breadbasket that fed much of the Gungu/Kwilu region in southwest DR Congo.
In 2011 we mobilized heads of schools and village chiefs to plant 1000 trees.

In 2011 we mobilized heads of schools and village chiefs to plant 1000 trees.

Since 2010, REVE Kandale has planted more than 7,000 trees --  mostly fruit trees and medicinal trees. The goals of tree-planting and the campaign to raise awareness for environment protection are to restore the local environment to its natural state. We aim to bring back wildlife that will provide an important source of protein and increase the availability of fruits and medicinal plants, thereby improving the health of the local community.

Tree-Planting

More than 10,000 fruit and medicinal trees have been planted since 2010.

More than 10,000 fruit and medicinal trees have been planted since 2010.

The region around Kandale along the Kwilu River produces a variety of crops, including cassava, millet, peanuts, beans, and many fruits such as bananas, mangoes, and pineapples. Food security is threatened due to farming and hunting practices that engulf much of the savannas in fire every year. Wildlife that is part of the local diet has steadily disappeared. The fires also contribute to soil erosion. Each year REVE Kandale members undertake vigorous planting programs to repopulate the forests, tending the small seedlings as they grow into mature trees.

Campaign Against Bushfires

Every year much of the savannas is engulfed in fire for hunting and farming.

Every year much of the savannas is engulfed in fire for hunting and farming.

REVE Kandale works closely with local village chiefs to educate community members about the negative impact of bush fires and the clear-cut removal of trees. These long-held practices have contributed to the loss of wildlife, insects, fruits, and other plants that traditionally played a key role in providing community members a healthy diet.

Return of the Caterpillars

REVE Kandale staff collecting “mingolo,” a favorite caterpillar species that is a source of protein for the Kandale community. The long-lost caterpillars are back due to tree-planting.

REVE Kandale staff collecting “mingolo,” a favorite caterpillar species that is a source of protein for the Kandale community. The long-lost caterpillars are back due to tree-planting.

In the years since reforestation of an area near Kandale began in 2011, a variety of trees and underbrush have flourished and been nurtured by local “forest-keepers.” Today, this rich environment is home to a variety of wildlife, including snakes and birds. In 2017, the return of the caterpillars — a nutritious and delicious staple of the local diet as well as a source of income—was a surprising and welcome sight. It provided solid evidence of the benefits of protecting the environment around Kandale.

Children are happy and fed.

Children are happy and fed.

Children no longer walk far to collect mushrooms.

Children no longer walk far to collect mushrooms.

More fruits than can be consumed locally.

More fruits than can be consumed locally.

 

REVE Kandale: Mwatha Gutumbuga Hubert Nvula-Ku, deputy coordinator of REVE Kandale and headmaster at Lycee Gin'a Gisanga in Kandale, Democratic Republic of the Congo discusses the impact REVE Kandale has had in the community in a relatively short time - video (French).